South Shore Locavores with Kristi Marsh

by Meri Lippard,
intern for edible South Shore and fellow locavore

Guest speaker Kristi Marsh

Guest speaker Kristi Marsh

The evening was buzzing with anticipation as the guest speaker, Kristi Marsh—mother, wife, cancer survivor, and author of Little Changes—spoke on the topic of going organic without breaking the bank.

Thursday January 17, the three-year Locavore tradition continued, hosted by edible South Shore and the Kingston Public Library and was sponsored by Jim’s Organic Coffee.

Marsh started her conversation with us with a virtual trip to the grocery store with two scenarios. The idealized version where she bought everything organic and all natural and everything was within budget. She went home and cooked a lovely meal for her family and everyone loved it. And then she shared her reality, buying everything organic and within budget is both challenging and almost impossible within the mainstream grocery store corporations.

She then explored the ways to buy local sustainable food, by aiming for items that are “fun, accessible, and affordable.” She shared her story of “doing what you can and where you can” by taking advantage of home grown food, utilizing your local farmer with a CSA (community supported agriculture), and local farmer’s markets as well as looking for all natural organic items in your grocery corporation nearest you. She emphasized sustainable eating as apart of a life style. Marsh shares her personal story and incorporates her knowledge of food, cleaning products, and cosmetics in seminar work shops as well as within her book.

The Locavore event was a great success and everyone was thrilled to hear Kristi speak. The yummy treats and beverages were provided by local sources, Simpson Spring beverages, Jim’s Organic Coffee, cider, and My Little Bakery’s bread, in addition to fellow locavorian’s confections.Come to our future events the third Thursday of every month at the Beal House in Kingston and become a locavore. The future events include Gardening in February; Bread, Cheese, and Olive Oil in March; Foraging in April; and GMOs in May.

RESOURCE LIST:
Kingston Public Library and edible South Shore magazine
Organic Eating on a Budget with Kristi March

Books available in the Old Colony Library Network:
Pandora’s Lunchbox: how processed food took over the American meal by Melanie Warner, 2013.

Little Changes. Tales of a Reluctant Home Eco-momics Pioneer by Kristi Marsh, 2012.

Wildly affordable organic: eat fabulous food, get healthy, and save the planet-all on $5 a day or less by Linda Watson, 2012.

Food Matters: A Guide to Conscious Eating by Mark Bittman, 2009.

In Defense of Food: an eater’s manifesto by Michael Pollan, 2008.

Tomorrow’s Table: organic farming, genetics and the future of food by Pamela C. Ronald, 2008.

The organic food shopper’s guide: what you need to know to select and cook the best food on the market by Jeff Cox, 2008.

The unhealthy truth: how our food is making us sick—and what we can do about it by Robyn O’Brien, 2009.

Exposed: the toxic chemistry of everyday products-who’s at risk and what’s at stake for
American power
by Mark Schapiro, 2007.

This Moment on Earth: today’s new environmentalists and their vision for the future by John Kerry and Teresa Heinz Kerry,  2007.

Websites with tips on “buying organic “
choosewiser.com Kristi Marsh’s website. “A place to learn, enjoy and create a healthier home” plus Eco-momics 101.

eatwild.com  Grassfed food and facts.

prevention.com   Organics 101, buying organic food tips.

theorganicfoodguide.com From NOFA, a source for finding certified organic food in Massachusetts

foodguide.com   Advice for healthy eating.

eatingwell.com Eating Well magazine. Articles, recipes, purchasing tips.

organic.org “Our mission is to educate people on the benefits of organic agriculture, food and products.”

About eSS&SC

The South Shore and South Coast has been home to hunting, gathering, fishing, farming––and great eating––for over 10,000 years. We are committed to identifying, devouring, and sharing all that Southeastern Massachusetts has to offer today and preserving local options for future generations.
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